Bariatric patients nutrition and menu

bariatric diet

Below is the bariatric diet menu plan (liquid diet) for the bariatric patient 

Meal TypeFoods
Breakfast• 200 ml fat-free milk
• 200 ml fat-free water
• 100 ml natural juice
Lunch• 200 ml fat-free milk
• 200 ml fat-free water
• Soup broth that is fat-free.
• 100 ml natural juice
Dinner• 200 ml fat-free milk
• 200 ml fat-free water
• Soup broth that is fat-free.

The menu above is all liquid owing to the need for the bariatric patients to take too many fluids based on the wounds that are present in the stomach and the need for the patient to have adequate fluids in the body at any given time. The fluids are critical in offering the recommended levels of hydration and providing the required nutritional value to the patient. A patient on the bariatric diet may experience some pain around the tummy. In such event, the bariatric multivitamins need to be prescribed to the patient alongside the required medication that could facilitate healing process in the patient. The bariatric multivitamins increase the appetitive levels that the patient may need to enable him or her to take the meals that have been prescribed at the recommended levels.

The suggested menu represents a relevant dietary plan for the bariatric patients. Main advantage entails the variety of fat-free delicacies that constitute healthy living by reduced cholesterol intake. The foods enable patient to have sufficient time for recovery of the stomach wounds that result after the surgical procedure. The menu above needs to be maintained continuously within the first week after one has undergone the medical procedure. During the second week, the patient may introduce lean meat and vegetable in the diet. However, the solid and the liquid food ought to be taken separately. Notably, the liquid food needs to be consumed first. The patient then needs to rest for at least half an hour before proceeding to the consumer the solid food. However, a nutritionist needs to be approving of the change of diet the recommend to the patient the set of foods that he or she may integrate gradually into his or her diet. The second week after the surgical procedure may also call for the introduction of snacks in the diet of the patient. The liquid snacks that the patient may use could half a cup of low-fat yogurt and half a cup of nonsugary pudding. Additional foods that may be integrated into the diet of the patient are one slice of bread, half a banana and ¼ cup of carrots to facilitate the recovery process of the patients.

A healthy meal hastens the healing process of a patient. Having a healthy meal is not only pegged on the nutritional content that they contain but the sensitivity to the medical condition of the patient. A healthy diet that is taken by a bariatric patient for at least one-week need to be in the liquid form. The nutritional requirements of a patient suffering from the three illnesses include a multivitamin, calcium, and Vitamin D. Therefore; the liquid diet offers the nutrients that are needed by the patient.

Cultural menu selections may contain adequate proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals depending on the combination of meals. However, in most incidences, the cultural foods do not include the complete set of food nutrients that are needed in a balanced diet.

The recommended age groups to utilize the food menu are both men and women aged between fifteen and forty years. The selected age group gets the recommended dietary allowance. During the first week, the patient is deprived of proteins. Proteins are integrated into the diet during the second week owing to the introduction of lean meat in the diet. All the food nutrients have low-fat meaning that the intended target group takes not more than 7% of calories from the saturated fats.

Culture and regional influences have an impact on the type of meals that are used by the gastric patients. The Midwest Region culture promoted eating of fruits, fresh vegetable and drinking too much water. Therefore, the cultural practices supplement the nutritional timelines that ought to be adhered to by the patient. The cultural practice of the Midwest Regions has been integrated into the menu above. Each meal course has water. The Midwest Region society and the medical fraternity also recommend that a patient needs to intake fruits to acquire the necessary vitamins. In the meal course presented in the menus, high vitamin intake is only available in the second week from the vegetable recommend in the meal course.

In conclusion, the menu plan for in-service post patient bariatric menu needs to be sensitive to their medical condition. The food has to be in liquid form during the first week since the patient needs a higher level of hydration. The preparation of the menu also needs to be sensitive to the nutritional requirements of the patient rather than the cultural foods that the patient ought to undertake. The recommended meal allowance must be sensitive to the recommended dietary allowance.

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